Showing posts with label Shortcrust. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shortcrust. Show all posts

Friday, March 23, 2012

SAUERKRAUT, POTATO & CHEDDAR PASTIES - PASTIES A LA CHOUCROUTE, POMME DE TERRE ET AU CHEDDAR ♥ A GUEST POST FOR SIMONE AT "JUNGLEFROG"

Sauerkraut Pasties Path 1 2 bis
In life, there are some beings who enlighten your days, inspire you greatly and are refreshing. The same can be said about certain blogs or bloggers, and both Simone and her excellent site definitely belong to that category. Everytime I visit Junglefrog, you can be sure that I'll be delighted by her magazine-like pictures, marvelous sense of humor and lovely recipes. It is indubitably far from being mundane or soulless!

This zesty Dutch lady is a skilled professional photographer whose work never to fails to wow me. I really appreciate her very European way of immortalizing dishes and I wish I could have half of her talent with my Nikon. Yet not only is she an ace behind the camera, but she is also a masterful cook and baker who wizzes up amazing cakes, colorful salads, comforting casseroles, delectable appetizers, balanced main courses, luscious desserts, etc...

I discovered Junglefrog through The Daring Bakers and have been following her online journal regularly since at least three years, thus I have been lucky to witness its evolution and see how the pretty caterpillar turned into a beautiful butterfly over the years. So, the day Simone asked me if I would be interested in writing a guest post for her, I felt overwhelmed with joy and excitement and immediately said "yes" without needing to meditate over her generous proposition. It is an honor for me to have been given that opportunity and I am truly thankful that she thought of me!
When you die, if you get a choice between going to regular heaven or pie heaven, choose pie heaven. It might be a trick, but if it's not, mmmmmmmm, boy.
- Jack Handy
As Simone is currently trying to focuse on healthy eating and as I love speaking about British grub, I thought that it would be wonderful if I shared my take on "Cornish Pasties" with her readers and spoke a bit about its origins.
 
Sauerkraut Pasties 3 bis
I got the idea and urge to bake my own pasties while watching Saturday Kitchen on BBC1. On this program animated by celebrity chef James Martin I heard Rick Stein relate a sad event that happened in 1999 (read what the BBC has written on that subject) when a eminent New York Times journalist shamelessly declared that "Cornish Pasties" were bland, like doorstops and "generally God awful". [...]

So, if that short introduction made your mouth water and your tastebuds tingle, tickled your curiosity, captivated your attention and gave you the urge to read my article, then please hop on over to Junglefrog in order to read the whole article, get a glimpse of my pictures, discover my recipe and pay a visit to Simone. 

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Etant donné que beaucoup de mes lecteurs francophones ne comprennent pas forcément l'anglais et que malheureusement peu d'entre-eux auront la chance de lire mon billet invité et dernier article en date sur le merveilleux blog Junglefrog qui appartient à ma talentueuse collègue néerlandaise Simone, je me suis permise de traduire la recette qui y figure afin que vous puissiez aussi en profiter car je pense qu'elle pourra vous intéresser (vous pouvez tout de même y jeter un coup d'oeil car ses recettes sont vraiment passionnantes et mon article contient d'autres images que celles exposées ici).

J'espère que mes "
Pasties A La Choucroute, Pomme De Terre Et Au Cheddar" vous plairont car ils sont inspirés d'une spécilaité très British qui nous vient de Cornouaille et qui est vraiment succulente. Cette création personnelle est une ode à la cuisine Anglaise qui est unique, versatile, si réconfortante, fabuleusement savoureuse, humble et qui est loin d'être insipide,fade, peu délicate et inintéressante comme le prétendent certaines personnes mal-attentionnées et à l'esprit étroit. Ce cliché est vieillissant, dépassé de mode et plus d'actualité...

~ Pasties A La Choucroute, Pomme De Terre Et Au Cheddar ~
Recette par Rosa Mayland, Mars 2012.

Ingrédients pour la "Pâte Brisée": 
200g de Farine blanche
100g de Farine complète
1 1/4 CC de Sel de mer fin 
80g de Beurre non-salé
70g de Saindoux
~80ml d'Eau très froide ou assez afin que la pâte forme une boule
Ingrédients Pour La "Garniture":
200g de Choucroute crue, éssorrée et hachée grossièrement
100g de Cheddar vieux, coupé en petits cubes
1 Pomme de terre (moyenne), pelée et coupée en petits morceaux
1 Oignon, haché finement
3/4 CC de Thym séché
Une pincée de noix de muscade
Poivre noir fraîchement moulu, selon goût
Le sel de mer, selon goût
Ingrédient Pour Le "Glaçage":
1 Oeuf, battu

Méthode pour la "Pâte Brisée":
1. Tamiser la farine et le sel dans un bol moyen.
2. Ajouter le beurre, le saidoux et frotter
la farine et le beurre/saindoux entre les doigts afin d'obtenir un mélange qui ait une texture sabloneuse.
3. Verser l'eau, graduellement, tout en mélangeant bien (ne plus ajouter d'eau quand la pâte a atteint la bonne consistance/ni trop mouillée, ni trop collante). Former une boule puis la mettre au frigo pendant que vous préparez la garniture.
Méthode Pour La "Garniture":
4. Dans un bol, mélanger ensemble tous les ingrédients pour la garniture. Mettre de côté.
Méthode Pour "Assemblage Et Cuisson Des Feulletés":
5. Préchauffer le four à 200 ° C.
6. Diviser la pâte en 5 portions égales.
7. Sur une surface farinée, abaisser l'un des morceaux en un cercle d'environ 18-19cm de diamètre.
8. Placer un cinquième du remplissage au centre de chaque cercle, en faisant un sorte de laisser un bord d'environ 1cm.
9. Avec l'oeuf battu, badigeonner les bords de la pâte.
10. Soigneusement rabattre les bords ensemble afin de former une crête, puis les pincer pour bien sceller et créer des bords ondulés (voir remarques).
11. Placer les feuilletés sur une plaque à pâtisserie recouverte de papier sulfurisé et badigeonner avec le restant d'oeuf battu
.
12. Cuire au centre du four pendant 35-40 minutes ou jusqu'à ce que les pasties soient dorés et croustillants.
13. Servir.


Remarques:
Les pasties doivent toujours être fermes, bien plains et jamais humides ou juteux (la pâte en souffrirait).
Si vous vous ne savez pas très bien comment former vos pasties, alors la première video 1 et la deuxième video vous seront d'une grande utilité (malheureusement elles sont en anglais).

Idées de présentation:
Servir pour le déjeuner ou le repas du soir et accompagner d'une salade de saison ainsi que d'une bière.
Les pasties sont aussi parfaits pour le pique-nique ou pour un repas canadien.

Friday, March 4, 2011

TARTINE BAKERY'S PUMPKIN PIE - RIP NANA

Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 3 bis
Today, I wish to dedicate my post to my beloved English grandmother Jean Margaret Robinson (née Cutts, 13.09.1927-18.02.2011) who passed away peacefully on Friday the 18th of February 2011 at the age of 84, nearly two years after my grandfather death. She was the last of my grandparents and my only link to England, the country where my heart belongs and my second home (I have dual nationality).

I might not have had a very close or deep relationship with her, and although still w
onder what she thought of me or if she loved me (unfortunately, the members of my family have never been known for expressing or showing their feelings) she has had a big influence on me as she was an admirable cook and baker who always delighted everybody with her divine creations. Eventhough she was not the attentionate, generous and present grandmother I dreamt of having, I will always remember her for being a remarkable person when it came to handling the pots and pans or to whip up the most palatable Sunday roast.

I particularly respect and thank my Nan for having been extremely talented in the kitchen and for being my culinary guide. She was a person
who showed me what traditional British food is supposed to taste like, whose cooking skills I have always wanted to acquire and whom I considered an authority in all things gourmet. She was clearly gifted in that domain (not only though - she also mastered other arts like painting, knitting, working with silver, etc...). I am so glad she indirectly motivated me to develop my craftiness for all things food-related. I really hope that from the heaven's above my granny is happy to see that I have surpassed her as a cook/baker and she is pleased with the adult I have become...

Unfortunately we have not spent much time together. My grandma was never enclined to sh
are a moment of complicity with granddaughter. She rarely showed me how to prepare food and hated having me "in her feet" when she was busy making dishes or baking cakes. In those moments, my grandmother didn't want to have a kid around her.

The only memory I have of me actually baking with my granny is when I beg
ged her to make "Coffee Kisses" cookies with me. As I had a little tantrum and whined a lot, Nana reluctantly gave way to my wish and accepted to show me how to prepare that divine treat. She didn't know that more than 20 years later I'd be blogging about that exceptional event and fondly cherishing that memory...
Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 1 bis
~ My grandmother and I, Derbyshire summer 1980 ~

RIP Nan.
I would have been extremely happy to hear you say "I love you"
or that you were proud of me,
but sadly I always waited for a sign of recognitions from you.
It is such a pity so many words were unspoken...
Anyway, I wish to thank you for all the good memories.
Love & kisses.
Rosa xxx

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

My post being about endings and new beginnings, it is all natura
lly that I will present a recipe which marks the conclusion of wintertime and the commencement of spring. By baking the last "Pumpkin Pie" of the cold season, it is my way of celebrating the circle of life, the endless passing of time and the complimentarity of life and death.

Last October I bought a few pumpkins to decorate my balcony table. They have kept very well and were exposed there until last week. Now that the nights are less cold and the days are a lot warmer, they have started to rot so as I hate to throw away food I decided to use my two small Japanese chestnut pumpkins ("Potimarron" in French) in order to put together a classic American "Pumpkin Pie".

As a child I was not keen on eating my mother's "Pumpkin Tarts" ("Tarte A La Courge", the Swiss equivalent of "Pumpkin Pie"), yet now I am very fond of that speciality. I remember that Fridays were officially called "tart days". A time of the week I particularly looked forward to as the weekend was very close (though I had to go to school on Saturday mornings, till 12pm) and we got to eat yummy stuff then.

My mother's
seasonal tarts were always greeted with much excitement, but the only time I was a little less than thrilled by what was awaiting us at the dinner table was when "Pumpkin Tart" was on the menu. One of the reason why I had a certain aversion for that treat is because the pumpkin used wasn't the kind you'd make sweet desserts with, but rather savory dishes. It had too much of a vegetable flavor to be enjoyable. The other reason is that my parents were never big fans of hyper spicy pastries (my mother only incorporated a little nutmeg and cinnamon to her filling) and unlike Americans, they especially disliked using cinnamon with a heavy hand. So even if her tart was made with quality produce (pumpkins from the market) and double cream it lacked a bit of oomph as the filling was not as luscious and rich-tasting as the one of the US "Pumpkin Pie"...

Now that I bake my own "Pumpkin Pies" I can fully enjoy that confection and play around with aromas. A few years ago I blogged about my own adaptation of a recipe I found in the book "Culinaria US" (please forgive the bad picture!) and while it is quite flawless it doesn't mean that I am not interested in trying other recipes. After all I am a foodie who cannot stop being in search of perfection.

So, after having eyed an attractive "Pumpkin Pie" recipe in my new "Tartine" cookbook, I decided to see what it was worth. Well, I wasn't deceived by the end result as my boyfriend and I had no problem polishing off the pie dish within the next 48 hours.

As usual, I adapted it to my taste and replaced
the brandy by rum, incorporated more salt to the pastry and added some additional cinnamon to the filling. Needless to say that Tartine Bakery's "Pumpkin Pie" was divine. It was not overly sweet, lusciously custardy, delightfully spicy, pleasantly earthy, wonderfully moist and had a refined flavor as well as a marvelously flaky and buttery pastry. In spite of being gorgeous I must point out that I might surely add a pinch of allspice to the filling the next time I bake this pie...

Pumpkin Pie 6 bis
~ Tartine's Pumpkin Pie ~

Recipe adapted from the book "Tartine" by Elisabeth Prueitt and Chad Robertson.

Makes a 25cm (10-inch) pie.

Ingredients For The "Flaky Pie Crust":
1 1/2 Tsp Fine sea salt
2/3 Cup (150ml) Ice cold water
3 Cups + 2 Tbs (455g) All-purpose flour
1 Cup + 5 Tbs (300g) Chilled butter, cut into small cubes
Ingredients For The "Pumpkin Filling":
2 Cups (510g) Pumpkin purée
3 Large egg
1 Large yolk
1 Cup (250ml) Double cream (35% fat)
2 Tbs Rum
1/2 Cup (100g) Light brown sugar
1 1/2 Tsp Ground cinnamon
1 Tsp Ground ginger
A pinch Ground cloves
A pinch Freshly grated nutmeg
A pinch Freshly ground black pepper
1 Tsp Fine sea salt

Method for the "Flaky Pie Crust":
1. Place the flour and salt in a big bowl.
2. Add the butter.
3. Using a pastry blender, cut the butter into the flour until you obtain a mixture ressembling coarse sand.
4. Pour the water over the crumbly mixture. Stir and toss with the help of a knive until the dough starts to come together.
5. Continue mixing (very gently) until you obtain a ball of dough which is not completely smooth. 6. On a floured surface, divide pastry in two, shape into a 2.5cm (1-inch) thick disk and wrap in plastic film.
7. Put in the fridge and let rest for about 2 hours or overnight.
8. Roll out one of the disks on a lightly floured surface to a thickness of 0.3cm (1/8 inch thickness) and from the center toward the edge in all directions, without forgetting to lift and rotate the pastry a quarter turn every now and then.
9. Once your pastry is a circle 1 1/2 inches larger than the tart pan, carefully transfer it to the buttered pan (folding in half, if necessary).
10. Ease it into the bottom and sides of the pan and pressing into place. Trim the edge with a knife.
11. Prick the bottom of the pastry with a fork, line with baking paper and fill with pie weights or dry beans.
12. Preheat the oven to 190° C (375° F).
13. Bake blind until the surface of the dough looks dry and has no opaque areas left, about 20 minutes.
14. Remove from the oven and remove the paper as well as the weights/beans, then return the shell to the oven for an extra 2-5 minutes (if the center starts to rise, gently pierce with a knife tip).
15. Let cool completely on a wire rack before filling.

Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 5 bis
Method For The "Pumpkin Filling":
1. Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F).
2. In a medium bowl, whisk together the pumpkin purée, whole eggs, egg yolk, cream and rum until smooth.
3. Add the the sugar, spices and salt. Mix until well blended.
4. Pour the filling into the pie shell and bake for about 1 hour, or until the pie is just set but the center is ever so slightly jiggly (the filling continues to set as it cools).
5. Cool completely on a wire rack.

Remarks:
Make sure that you pumpkin purée is not too wet. Cook it a bit longer to let the liquid evaporate or place in a sieve overnight in order to get rid of the excess moisture.
If you wish you cxan replace the rum by brandy, cognac, whisky or sherry.
You can add a little more sugar to the filling if you find that it is not sweet enough.

Serving suggestions:
Serve at room temperature with whipped cream.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 6 bis
~ Jean & Roy in front of a pub somewhere in Derbyshire in 1998 ~

~ Pumpkin Pie Selon Tartine Bakery ~


Recette adaprée du livre "Tartine" par Elisabeth Prueitt and Chad Robertson.

Pour un pie de 25cm de diamètre.

Ingrédients Pour la "Pâte Brisée":
1 1/2 CC de Sel de mer fin
150ml d'Eau très froide
455g de Farine blanche
300g de Beurre très froid, coupé en petits cubes
Ingrédients Pour La "Garniture":
510g de Purée de potimarron
3 Gros oeufs
1 Jaune d'oeuf
250ml de Crème double (35% de mat. grasses)
2 CS de Rhum
100g de Sucre brun clair
1 1/2 CC de Cannelle en poudre
1 CC de gingembre en poudre
Une pincée de Clous de girofles en poudre
Une pincée de Noix de muscade fraîchement râpée
Une pincée de Poivre noir fraîchement moulu
1 CC de Sel de mer fin
Méthode Pour la "Pâte Brisée":
1. Dans un grand bol, mélanger la farine au sel.
2. Ajouter le beurre.
3. A l'aide d'un malaxeur à pâtisserie, couper le beurre dans la farine jusqu'à obtention d'une mixture ressemblant un crumble.
4. Incorporer l'eau et mélanger à l'aide d'un couteau de table.
5. Continuer à mélanger (délicatement) jusqu'à ce que vous obteniez une boule de pâte (pas trop homogène tout de même).
6. Sur une surface farinée, diviser la pâte en deux portions égales e t les former un deux disques de 2.5cm d'épaisseur, puis les emballer avec du film plastique.
7. Les mettre au frigo (2 heures au minimum ou une nuit).
8. Sur une surface farinée étaler (en allant du centre en direction des bords et en rotatant la pâte de temps en temps) un des disques de pâte à une épaisseur de 0.3cm.
9. Une que que vous aurez obtenu un cercle de pâte de 33cm (plus grand que le moule), le transférer délicatement dans le moule.
10. Garnir le moule avec la pâte et couper les bords.
11. Piquer le fond du pie avec une fourchette, Protéger la pâte piquée avec une feuille de papier sulfurisé découpée à la dimension voulue et remplir avec des billes de cuisson ou des haricots.
12. Préchauffer le four à 190° C.
13. Cuire à blanc pendant 20 minutes, ou jusqu'à ce que la surface de la pâte soit sèche et n'ait plus de zones opaques.
14. Sortir la pâte du four et retirer le papier avec les poids, puis la remettre au four pour 2-5 minutes supplémentaires (si le centre gonfle, piquer la pâte avec la pointe d'un courteau).
5. Laisser refroidir sur une grille avant de remplir avec la garniture.

Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 2 bis
~ My grandfather, my grandmother & I, Geneva 1978 ~

Méthode Pour La "Garniture":

1. Préchauffer le four à 160°C.
2. Dans un bol moyen, battre ensemble la purrée de potimarron les oeufs, le jaune d'oeuf, la crème et le rhum afin d'obtenir une masse homogène.
3. Ajouter le sucre, les épices et le sel. Bien incorporer.
4. Verser la garniture dans le moule et cuire pendant 1 heure, ou jusqu'à ce que la garniture soit un peut tremblotante en son centre (elle continuera à se solidifier pendant q u'elle refroidira).
5. Laisser refroidir sur une grille.

Remarques:
Votre purrée de potimarron doit être assez épaisse et ne pas contenir de liquide. Afin de réduire la quantité de liquide, cuire la purrée jusqu'à ce que le liquide se soit évaporé ou mettre la purrée dans une passoire et laisser égoutter pendant toute une nuit.
Vous pouver remplacer le rhum par du sherry, whisky, du brandy ou du co gnac.
Si la garniture n'est pas assez sucrée, il vous est possible d'ajouter plus de sucre.

Idées de présentation:
Servir à température ambiante avec de la crème fouettée.

Pumpkin Pie Picnik collage 4 bis

Friday, January 21, 2011

CAROB SHOOFLY PIE - PIE À LA CAROUBE

Shoofly Pie Picnik collage 4.1 bis
I've always been a big lover of pies. Having been born into an Anglo-Swiss family this pastry has never been unknown to me. As a matter of fact our table was regularly graced by pies of all kind...

Since I have English roots the pies that we ate were exclusively of the British kind. Th
e ones my mother and gradmother made were mostly composed of fruits (apple pie, black currant pie, gooseberries pie, lemon meringue pie, etc...) or meat (steak & kidney pie, pork pies, etc...). American pies were unknown to us and it is only when I started baking for myself and developping a strong interest for the US cuisine as well as it's culture that I ate my n°1 New World pie. Conquered by this land's baked goods I broadened my culinary horizon by preparing more of them (pumpkin pies, pecan pies, sweet potato pies, cream pies, etc...).

It has to be said that with ferociously
monarchy-worshipping and patriotic grandparents who entertained that very typical old-fashioned and unreasonable British chauvinist thought pattern (that thankfully only a small bunch of people entertain in the UK) and parents who had a bad conception of America (mainly politically and usually in a narrow-minded manner - lumping everybody in the same group) there was no way I would have come any close to the wonderful gastronomy of this country (we did eat homemade hamburgers, though LOL). In both my house and my grandparent's America was a taboo subject.

Anyway, I might share the same blood as my family and be proud to have English origins, but I am far from having such stubborn, conservative and bigoted opinions. Great Britain's kingship and colonial history means nothing to me - I despise it - and I refuse to judge an entire nation by it's leaders. I know better than that...

Since the tender age of 6 I have fed a passion for the USA. It started when I began reading the cartoon book Yakari and when my admiration for Native Americans was born. Then, it grew a little bigger as I began discovering Heavy Metal music and became besotted with my favorite bands whose musicians I worshipped. Finally it reached a higher level when I embarked on my culinary journey in 1998 and discovered the world of blogging in 2003.

Being a foodie and feeding an interest for all things cultural that are linked to the States it is quite naturally that my knowledge of traditional American food expanded with the years. Not only do I love surfing on US blogs, but I also appreciate reading cookbooks by writers/bakers/cooks hailing from the "Land of Opportuinity" and being in contact with people who come from this part of the world as generally they are far more laid-back, easy-going and accessible than the Swiss folks. That is how I read about "Shoofly Pies" for the first time.

I find the name of that pie, it's origin as well as it's composition very intriguing. So after years of promising myself that I would try making it I finally transposed my wishes into reality and created my own "Shoofly Pie" recipe.

This molasses pie comes from the Pennsylvania Dutch who are descendants of Germanic emigrants originating from Southwestern Germany and Switzerland, but it is also rooted deep into the Southern culinary traditions. Apparently it holds it's name from the fact that it attracts flies that have to be "shooed away". This speciality shares simiarities with "Montgomery Pie", another Pensylvanian treat that varies very slightly in it's composition (lemon juice added to the molasses filling and instead of being topped with crumble it is garnished with buttermilk cake batter).

Traditionally this pie is made with sugar cane molasses, but as I love breaking the rules I decided to try something different and original. My version of "Shoofly Pie"
can be quite surprising, yet it isn't extremely different to the original one.

Instead of making the filling with that backstrap by-product sugar beet or sugar cane which has quite a strong, tangy, spicy and bitter flavor I used carob molasses which has a milder, fruitier and sweeter aroma. This thick brown uncrystallized syrup is made by soaking milled carob pods (fruits from the carob tree) in water and then reducing the extracted liquid.

This fruit
which is quite popular around the Mediterranean Sea (it is native of that region) can be employed as a sweetener, to make refreshing drinks, delicious spreads, cakes and desserts. It is very versatile, healthy, contains no fat, is rich in iron, calcium and nutrients.

During the 1970's it was used as substitute for chocolate. But, we all know that it is a terrible error to make a parallel between carob and cacao. Fistly, there is NO replacement for chocolate and secondly, carob has a flavor of it's own. If you expect it to taste like chocolate then you will be bitterly disappointed and will have a negative impression of it. It is for that reason that the tragic misuse of carob led people to hate and criticize it violently (I bet some of your still shudder with revulsion at the memory of eating those carob brownies that your hippy mom made LOL). I find that so sad as carob is such a valuable as well as unique product that cannot be compared to anything.


I am so glad to have integrated that delicacy into my "Carob Shoofly Pie" as
it could not have been sublimed in a better fashion. I am particularly fond of the divinely earthy, nutty, slightly tangy, complex and delicate date-like fragrances the carob molasses confers to the pie.

The filling is marvelously gooey as moist, the flaky (no wet bottom here) crust's
salty note contrasts remarkably well with the pie's overall sweetness and the crumble add's a perfect touch of spiciness and crispiness to the whole. What an amazing combination!

Needless to say that the "Carob Shoofly Pie" devoured hastily...

Shoofly Pie 2 bis
~ Carob Shoofly Pie ~
Recipe by Rosa @Rosa's Yummy Yums 2011

Makes one 23cm (9 inch) pie.

Ingredients For The "Pastry":
300g Plain white flour (no self-raising flour)
1 Tsp Fine sea salt (you can add 1/2 Tsp more if you like the taste of salt)
150g Unsalted butter (or 100g Unsalted butter & 50g
Lard)
~ 80 ml Water
Ingredients For The "Filling":
1 Cup (480g) Carob molasses
1 Big Egg
3/4 Cup (180ml) Milk
1 Tbs Cornstarch
Ingredients For The "Crumbs":
1 1/2 Cups (190g) Flour
1/2 Cup (120g) Light brown sugar
2 Tsp Cinnamon
1/4 Cup (60g) Unsalted butter
3 Tbs Water

Method For "The Pastry":
1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl/bassin.
2. Add butter and rub between the fingers until the mixture is flaky.
3. Pour in the water, gradually, while continuously cutting and stirring with a knife. Stop adding water when the dough is stiff. It should not be sticky or wet. Gather up into a soft ball and place it in the fridge while you prepare the filling.
4. Preheat the oven to 190° C (375° F).
5. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface to a 33cm (13 inch) round.
6. Line your buttered 23cm (9 inch) pie dish with the pastry and trim the edges, then crimb them decoratively. With a fork prick the bottom of the pie.
7. Place in the freezer for about 10 minutes.

Shoofly Pie Picnik collage 1 bis
Method For The "Filling":
8. Meanwhile
mix the milk together with the cornstarch (to dissolve it), then add the molasses and the egg. Set aside.
Method For The "Crumbs":
9. In another bowl combine the flour, sugar and cinnamon.
10. Add the butter and work it into the flour with a pastry blender. Add the water and continue the process until you obtain a crumbly mixture
.
11. Pour the molasses mixture into the pie crust and spoon the crumbs on top of it.

12. Bake for 40 minutes.
13. Let cool on a wire rack.


Remarks:
Always lift the flour out of the bowl while rubbing; it makes the butter/flour mixture airy.
Be careful not to add too much water as the pastry should not be stick to the touch.
While mixing the water to the flour/butter mixture never work the pastry like a bread do
ugh, otherwise you would end up with a stiff, hard and elastic pastry.
You can replace the carob molasses by any other molasses (apple, grape, pear, pomegranate or sugar cane molasses).

Serving suggestions:
Serve warm or at room temperature with a dollop of whipped cream.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Shoofly Pie Picnik collage 2 bis
~ Pie A La Mélasse De Caroube ~
Recette par Rosa @Rosa's Yummy Yums 2011

Pour un pie de 23cm.


Ingrédients Pour La "Pâte Brisée":
300g de Farine blanche/fleur
1 CC de Sel de mer fin (ajouter 1/2 CC si vous aimez votre pâte un peu salée)
150g de Beurre non-salé, coupé en petit dés (ou 100g de beurre + 50g de saindoux)
~ 80ml d'Eeau très froide ou assez afin que la pâte forme une boule
Ingrédients Pour La "Garniture":
480g de Mélasse de caroube
1 Gros Oeuf
180ml de Lait
1 CS de Maïzena
Ingrédients Pour Le "Crumble":
190g de Farine blanche
120g de Sucre brun clair
2 CC de Cannelle en poudre
60g de Beurre non-salé
3 CS d'Eau

Méthode pour la "Pâte Brisée":
1. Tamiser la farine et le sel dans un bol moyen.
2. Ajouter le beurre et frotter
la farine et le beurre entre les doigts afin d'obtenir un mélange qui ait la texture sabloneuse.
3. Verser l'eau, graduellement, tout en mélangeant bien (n'ajoutez plus d'eau quand la pâte aura atteint la bonne consistance/ni trop mouillée, ni trop collante). Former une boule puis la mettre au frigo pendant que vous préparez la garniture.
4. Préchauffer le four à 190° C.
5. abaisser la pâte sur une surface farinée afin d'obtenir un rond de 33cm.
6. Garnir le moule avec la pâte et couper les bords, puis créer des motifs décoratifs. Avec une fourchette piquer le fond.
7. Mettre la pâte 10 minutes au congélateur.

Shoofly Pie Picnik collage 3 bis
Méthode Pour La "Garniture":
8. Pendant ce temps préparer la garniture. Mélanger ensemble le lait et la maïzena (elle doit être complètement dissoute) et ajouter la mélasse et l'oeuf
. Mettre de côté.
Méthode Pour Le "Crumble":
9. Dans un autre bol, mélanger la farine avec le sucre et la cannelle.
10. Ajouter le beurre et sabler du bout des doigts. Ajouter l'eau et sabler à nouveau afin d'o
btenir un crumble.
Méthode Pour La "Cuisson":
10. Verser la préparation à la mélasse dans le fond du pie et saupoudrer le dessus avec le crumble.
11. Cuire pendant 40 minutes.
12. Laisser refroidir sur une grille.

Remarques:
Soulevez toujours la farine lorsque vous la frottez avec le beurre: ç a apporte de l'air au mélange.
Faites bien attention de ne pas ajouter trop d'eau à votre pâte. Elle ne doit pas être collante.
Pendant que vous mélangez l'eau au mélange farine/beurre, ne la travaillez pa
s telle une pâte à pain, autrement votre pâte sera dure, élastique et pas manipulable du tout car vous aurez libéré le gluten contenu dans la farine.
Vous pouvez remplacer la mélasse de caroube pour la mélasse de votre choix (pomme, raisin, poire, grenade ou mélasse traditionnelle).

Idées de présentation:
Servir tiède ou à température ambiante avec un peu de crème fouettée
.

Shoofly Pie Picnik collage 5.1 bis

Friday, November 19, 2010

SMOKED HADDOCK & GRUYÈRE TARTLETS

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 1 bis
I make no secret of the fact that I am a big supporter of English specialities and get mad every time I have to read or hear the moronic comments of ignorant people who have the guts to bring British gastronomy down. That irritates me to the highest point as most of the time they don't know what they are talking about and sheepishly follow the false propoganda regarding that country's food...

I mean, Great B
ritain has proved to have amazing chefs, shown the world that bad food can only be blamed on careless and inexperienced "cooks" and not on tradition (there is no bad food only bad cooks). When will certain individuals stop smirking at the word association "British Cuisine"? England not only has wonderful produces, but also an ancient cooking wisdom so it's about time that the above-mentioned folks put an end to those myths.

Being half-English and coming from a family of brilliant homecooks it is my duty to carry on those old eating customs and not lose my culinary patrimony that
is so dear to me and perpetuate my link to that island. It is for that reason that I am a big fan of beautiful magazines such as Good Food, Delicious and Jamie which offer hundreds of gorgeous recipes every month.

While browsing through one of my Good Food magazines a particular Gordon Ramsay recipe caught my attention. His "Haddock & Gruyère T
artlets" looked so scrumptious. I had to make them as soon as possible.

Smoked haddock (made with either cod or had
dock which is partially boned & lightly salted/in Scotland known under the name of "Finnan Haddie") has always been a produce I've enjoyed when I was in England. I remember that my grandmother bought it from a fish seller who travelled around with his van and sold extremely fresh goods (the fishes were still swimming in the sea no more than 3-4 hours before) out of the back of his truck. Once a week he stopped in front of my grandparents' stone cottage, honked and happily chatted with us while presenting his fantastic choice of goods . He had the most amazing fishes I have ever eaten.

Thankfully since I live extremely close to the French border (a few meters away) it is possible for me to buy smoked haddock from the Casino supermarket in Gaillard, Haute-Savoie. Although the French smoked haddock is a little dryer, a lot smokier, less plump/thick, dyed with annatto and seems to be made with whiting (and not cod nor haddock like it's English counterpart) I am already very grateful to find it in stores as it nostalgically reminds me of my holidays in Belper, Derbyshire.

As usual, I took the liberty to adapt Gordon Ramsay's recipe and ommitted to prebake the pastry and didn't serve my tartlets with a poached egg, but a bunch of arugula/rocket instead. I was really happy with the results as my "Haddock & Gruyère Tartlets" were as pretty as on the Good Food pictures and tasted just divine.

The pastry (my recipe) was delightfully flaky and beautifully golden, the filling was very
flavorful and the lighty mustardy Gruyère béchamel paired perfectly well with the smokiness and delicate fish aromas of the haddock, and the arugula added great nutty, spicy (peppery-mustardy) as well as warm notes. Definitely a dish I will make again!

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 6 bis
~Haddock & Gruyère Tartlets ~
Recipe for the "Shortcrust Pastry" by Rosa@Rosa's Yummy Yums & recipe for the "Haddock & Gruyère Tartlets" adapted from Gordon Ramsay.

Makes 4x 12-14cm tartlets.

Ingredients For The "Shortcrust Pastry":
300g Plain white flour (no self-raising flour)
1 Tsp Fine sea salt (you can add 1/2 Tsp more if you like the taste of salt)
150g Unsalted butter (or 100g Unsalted butter & 50g
Lard)
~80 ml Water
Ingredients For the "Tarts":
500g Shortcrust pastry (recipe above)
400g Smoked haddock with the skin
400ml Milk
2 Egg yolks
2 Tsp Mustard (Dijon, yellow, basic or English)
25g Unsalted butter
25g All-purpose flour
100g Mature AOC Gruyère, grated finely
100g Arugula (washed), to use as decoration

Method For The "Shortcrust Pastry":
1. Sift the flour and salt into a bowl/bassin.
2. Add butter and rub between the fingers until the mixture is flaky.
3. Pour in water, gradually, while continuously cutting and stirring with a knife. Stop adding water when the dough is stiff. It should not be sticky or wet. Gather up into a soft ball and place it in the fridge while you prepare the filling.
Method for the "Tarts":
1. Put the haddock in a medium saucepan and cover with the milk. Season the milk with a little black pepper and bring to a boil, then turn off the heat. Set aside until cool enough to handle.
2. Remove the fish from the milk and strain the milk into a jug.
In medium pan, melt the butter. When it has melted and is starting to sizzle, stir in the flour and cook until combined to a sandy consistency.
3. Gradually stir in the poaching milk, mixing well after each addition.
4. Bring to a boil and let simmer over a low heat for 5 minutes until you have a smooth white sauce.
6. Remove the pan from the heat, then add the Gruyère and stir.
7. Break the haddock into large flakes into a medium bowl and throw away the skin and the bones.

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 4 bis
8. Add the egg yolks and mustard to the haddock and stir in the cheese sauce (it should be at room temperature). Set aside.
9. Divide the pastry into 4, thinly roll out each piece, then cut out 4 circles big enough to line 4 x 12-14cm fluted tartlet pans. Press the pastry into the sides of the tin and roll the surface of the pan with your rolling pin so that the excess will fall away.
10. Preheat the oven to 200° C (400° F). Place the pans in the fridge to cool for 10 minutes, then remove from the fridge and prick the base with a fork.
11. Divide the filling between the tartlet cases, then bake for 25-30 minutes until the filling is puffed up and golden brown like cheese on toast, and the pastry is golden brown.
12. Remove from the oven and leave the tarts to cool slightly.
13. Decorate with the arugula (on top).

Remarks:
Always lift the flour out of the bowl while rubbing; it makes the butter/fl
our mixture airy.
Be careful not to add too much water as the pastry should not be stick to the touch.
While mixing the water to the flour/butter mixture never work the pastry like a bread dough, otherwise you would end up with a stiff, hard and elastic pastry.

You can replace the Gruyère by AOC Appenzeller or AOC Vacherin Fribourgeois
The filling can be made a day ahead and chilled.
The tarts can be made several hours ahead and eaten at room temperature or slightly reheated. Don't store in the fridge, or the pastry will get soggy.

Serving suggestions:
Serve the tartlets warm from the oven.
You can top it with a poached egg and chives or accompany them with a salad (lamb's lettuce).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 3 bis
~ Tartelettes Au Haddock Et Au Gruyère ~
Recette pour la "Pâte Brisée" par Rosa@Rosa's Yummy Yums & recette pour les "Tartelettes Au Haddock Et Au Gruyère" adaptée de Gordon Ramsay.

Pour 4 tartelettes de 12-14cm de diamètre.

Ingrédients pour la "Pâte Brisée":
300g de Farine blanche/fleur
1 CC de Sel de mer fin (ajouter 1/2 CC si vous aimez votre pâte un peu salée)
150g de Beurre non-salé, coupé en petit dés (ou 100g de beurre + 50g de saindoux)
~80ml d'Eeau très froide ou assez afin que la pâte forme une boule
Ingrédients pour les "Tartelettes":
500g de Pâte brisée (recette au dessus)
400g de Haddock fumé avec la peau
400ml de Lait
2 Jaunes d'oeufs
2 CC de Moutarde (Dijon, Thomy, américaine, forte anglaise ou douce)
25g de Beurre non-salé
25g de Farine blanche
100g de Gruyère AOC mature, râpé finement
Une poignée de roquette pour décorer

Méthode pour la "Pâte Brisée":
1. Tamiser la farine et le sel dans un bol moyen.
2. Ajouter le beurre et frotter
la farine et le beurre entre les doigts afin d'obtenir un mélange qui ait la texture sabloneuse.
3. Verser l'eau, graduellement, tout en mélangeant bien (n'ajoutez plus d'eau quand la pâte aura atteint la bonne consistance/ni trop mouillée, ni trop collante). Former une boule puis la mettre au frigo pendant que vous préparez la garniture.
Méthode pour les "Tartes":
1. Mettre le haddock dans une casserole et le recouvrir avec le lait. Assaisonner le lait avec un peu de poivre noir et porter à ébullition, puis éteindre le feu. Mettre de côté et laisser refroidir de manière à pouvoir manipuler le poisson avec les mains.
2. Sortir le poisson du lait et verser le lait dans un pot tout en le filtrant.
Dans une casserole moyenne, faire fondre le beurre. Une fois fondu et quand il commence à grésiller, ajouter la farine et bien mélanger afin que le tout soit homogène et ait une texture sabloneuse.
3. Graduellement, verser le lait (dans lequel le haddock à cuit). Mélanger après chaque ajout.
4. Porter à ébullition, puis laisser mijoter à feu doux pendant 5 minutes jusqu'à obtention d'une sauce crémeuse et assez épaisse.
6. Enlever la casserole du feu, puis incorporer le Gruyère tout en remuant.
7. Emietter le haddock (morceaux pas trop petits) et jeter la peau et les arrêtes.

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 5 bis
8. Ajouter les jaunes d'oeufs et la moutarde, puis la béchamel au Gruyère (à temp. ambiante) et mélanger le tout.
9. Diviser la pâte en 4 et l'étaler afin de pouvoir couper en cercles assez grands pour foncer les moules à tartelettes de 4 x 12-14cm. Une fois cela fait, se débarasser de l'excédent de pâte.
10. Préchauffer le four à 200° C. Mettre les moules au frigo pendant 10 minutes, puis les retirer du frigo et les piquer avec une fourchette.
11. Remplir chaque tartelette avec de la garniture, puis cuire les tartelettes pendant 25-30 minutes jusqu'à ce que la garniture et la pâte soient joliment dorées (suffisement cuitent).
12. Sortir les tartelettes du four et les laisser refroidir légèrement avant de servir.
13. Decorer avec de la roquette.

Remarques:
Soulevez toujours la farine lorsque vous la frottez avec le beurre: ç a apporte de l'air au mélange.
Faites bien attention de ne pas ajouter trop d'eau à votre pâte. Elle ne doit pas être collante.
Pendant que vous mélangez l'eau au mélange farine/beurre, ne la travaillez pa
s telle une pâte à pain, autrement votre pâte sera dure, élastique et pas manipulable du tout car vous aurez libéré le gluten contenu dans la farine.
Le Gruyère peut être remplacé par de l'Appenzeller AOC ou du Vacherin Fribourgeois AOC.
La garniture peut être faite le jour avant et mise au frigo.
Les tartelettes peuvent être cuites quelques heures à l'avance et mangées à température ambiante ou être réchauffées.
Ces tartelettes ne doivent pas être conservées au frigo car elles deviendront toutes molles et humides.

Idées de présentation:
Servir les tartelettes chaudes.
Vous pouvez aussi déposer un oeuf poché sur la tartelette (milieu) et saupoudrer avec un peu de ciboulette ou manger vos tartelettes avec une bonne salade (mâche).

Haddock Tartlets Picnik collage 2 bis